Skip to main content

Shared Space

Coproduction is a buzz word. It gets used a lot. And it gets used to describe a lot of things.

We always start by thinking about power and control. I guess that's because we are used to not having either, despite being told we have been given them.

So, for us, coproduction is not a new type of engagement or involvement. Engagement and involvement always rely on someone else saying you can get involved. Usually the "someone else" is your service provider, local authority or government. As long as someone has the power to choose to involve you, they can choose to stop involving you as well. Same goes for empowerment, engagement and all these other buzz words for shifting how things work between the powerful and less powerful.

The hard reality is that the "someone else" really does hold the power and control. They have the money, the influence, the professional training, sometimes even the democratic right if they were elected. As long as "someone else" holds power and control, engagement and involvement are hugely important for improving the quality of services, policies and planning.

The problem for us comes when "someone else" holds the power but believes (or pretends) that we are all working as equals and we are coproducing.

We came up with a way of trying to explain the difference between involvement and coproduction. We call it "My space, Your spaceShared space". The idea was sparked by a chance comment from Professor Catherine Robinson 18 months ago when we were trying to work out why we couldn't communicate how our vision of "team research" was different from the teams in most inclusive research.

Over the 18 months, the seed of an idea has grown into something we are ready to put out there as our contribution to the debate on the future relationship of public services and public.

Do watch the PowerPoint show, and let us know what you think.

If it makes sense but leaves you wondering how to do it, you are welcome to talk to us about workshops, consultancy and action learning sets.

If you think it's a load of cobblers as a concept or completely impractical as a practice, we'd love to hear why. We love critical friends who help refine and challenge our thinking.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

£149,946 for new National Lottery funded research project

Barod Community Interest Company is delighted to announce that we will be working in partnership for the next two years with Carmarthenshire People First, My LifeMy Choice (an Oxford organisation), People First Dorset and Social Firms Wales on a project called The Bridge. Says Anne Collis, project lead, The project is called The Bridge because we aim to bridge the gap between the current situation where too many people with learning difficulties are working for free and their organisations struggle for funding, to a future where individuals and organisations are well paid for their work”.
People with learning difficulties across the UK have developed highly desirable skills through their involvement in self-advocacy and are engaged in high level policy and service design work. However it is rare to be able to secure well paid work that uses these skills, and many groups struggle to find funding.

Five years ago, a small group of people with and without learning difficulties founded Ba…

Changing Places Campaign

Changing Places
David works for Barod and is a member of Powys People First. He has been a passionate campaigner for Changing Places a project aimed at getting everyone access to bathrooms and the freedom and independence that goes with it.


you can find out more here:
www.changing-places.org/ 
powyspeoplefirst.org/


Swansea really does have jargon busters

On Tuesday, we ran a game at the Swansea Behaviour Change Festival. We called it 'Swansea’s Got Jargon*-Busters'.
*Jargon: a word or phrase not used in everyday life, or that is being used with a different, special meaning. It often goes with waffling and speaking too fast.
We wanted to see if, when faced with a panel of three people with learning difficulties, people could talk for 2 minutes about their job or what they'd learned at the Festival without using jargon. If someone on the panel couldn't understand them easily, they would buzz. Three buzzes and you're out. If you are still going at 2 minutes, you got a rosette saying 'I'm a Jargon Buster'. 
Summary
People who took part, the panel and the observers were surprised and pleased that people succeeded.Face to face communication is easier than communicating in writing.Jargon is comfortable.You need to know your subject to be able to explain it without jargon.If you find a connection with the people, c…